How Much Does A Bowling Ball Cost?

While bowling balls all have the same basic dimension, what makes up the materials of a ball can be completely different. It is this difference that will determine how much you can expect to pay for a bowling ball.  It goes without saying the more complex the ball the more it will cost but what would be reasonable? New bowling balls can range in cost anywhere from $40 to $250. I broke down what you can expect to pay depending on the type of ball you are considering.

 

$40 – $60 plastic bowling balls
Bowling ball in this range are generally ‘plastic’ or polyester balls that don’t have a customized core to give the ball a hook.  These types of bowling balls are great for shots that require a straight path like on spare pickups or those tough corner pin (7 or 10) shots. Because these types of balls are for a specific purpose, many bowlers will have a plastic ball and a high performance ball.

 

$75 – $150 vanity bowling balls
These type of bowling balls are the same as the plastic balls but are branded with popular logos, images or sports teams. For example, if you’re a fan of the Chicago Bears, like I am, then you could get a bowling ball with their logo on it. There’s actually a wide variety of image based or branded bowling balls that you could choose from. Even though these are just ‘plastic’ bowling balls, they cost more because of the trademark and extra artwork that gets added to them.

 

$75 – $150 entry-level performance bowling balls
Entry level performance balls have a custom core that gives the ball that little extra momentum to hook but they don’t have a huge hook potential like that you often see professional bowlers are able to achieve.  Casual league bowlers generally can benefit from these type of balls because of the combination of value and performance.

 

$150 – $250 mid to high level performance ball
These are the creme-de-le-creme of bowling balls. The ones that are going to be the main weapon in your bowling arsenal. These balls will have technologically advanced cores that gives the ball the hook flare needed to hit the pocket just right to get that coveted strike.  The outer surface (also known as the coverstock) usually are of a higher grade that is designed to perform on well on different lane conditions and oil patterns.  Now the price range can vary in this category as well as the performance. But just because a bowling ball has a high price tag doesn’t mean its the best bowling ball for you.  The higher price tag usually means that there was more that went into creating the ball.

 

At the end of the day, selecting a bowling ball doesn’t have to be too difficult as long as you know what to look for. Now that you have an idea of what you can expect when considering buying a bowling ball, deciding on which one is the best for you and which fits your budget will be a much easier process. Happy hunting on your next bowling ball.

 

 



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